Welcome to UNVAELD where unlocking the full potential of your workforce becomes your competitive advantage.

Neurodiversity insights from Instinctif Partners.


Follow the author on LinkedIn
https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexandraunvaeld/

Recently, UNVAELD had the pleasure of attending an insightful event on neurodiversity hosted by Instinctif Partners. Our amazing guest, Jon Dunckley from About Consulting shed light on the misconceptions surrounding neurodiversity and how we, as a society, can better the experience for those who are neurodivergent and how in turn, our experience will be better also.

In this blog, we will debunk some of the myths surrounding neurodiversity, highlight the strengths associated with various conditions and discuss the benefits of harnessing these strengths in a professional setting. All of the information in this blog has been inspired by the Instinctif Partners x Jon Dunckley event.

 

Debunking Misconceptions

Misconception #1: Dyspraxia:

“They’re just clumsy.” Dyspraxia, a diagnosis characterised by difficulties in coordination and motor skills, is often unfairly associated with clumsiness. Dyspraxia is a spectrum diagnosis and its impact can vary widely from person to person. Some individuals with dyspraxia may indeed struggle with activities that involve coordination, such as tying shoelaces, handwriting or catching a ball, which can lead to perceived “clumsiness.” It’s important not to stereotype or stigmatise individuals with dyspraxia based solely on their coordination challenges. Many individuals with dyspraxia excel in areas that require creativity and problem-solving. For instance, famous actor Daniel Radcliffe has openly spoken about his dyspraxia and how it didn’t hinder his successful career.

 

Misconception #2: ADHD:

“They’re always on the go.” Contrary to the belief that individuals with ADHD are constantly hyperactive and restless, it’s important to note that there are three different types of ADHD and not all individuals with ADHD exhibit hyperactivity. ADHD is categorised into three main types or presentations: Predominantly Inattentive, Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive and Combined. Entrepreneur and billionaire Sir Richard Branson, who has one form of ADHD, has used his diagnosis and innovative thinking to build a global empire, showcasing that ADHD manifests differently in various individuals.

Misconception #3: Autism:

“Autistic people don’t have partners.” Autism is often misunderstood as an isolating diagnosis. However, autistic individuals can form deep and meaningful relationships. Also, autism is a diagnosis that can be inherited which automatically disproves this common misconception. Acclaimed animal scientist Temple Grandin, who is on the autism spectrum, has demonstrated that autism doesn’t preclude successful personal connections.

 

Misconception #4: Dyscalculia:

“They’re just not clever.” Dyscalculia is a specific learning disorder that primarily affects an individual’s ability to understand maths. It is sometimes referred to as a “mathematical learning disability.” Dyscalculia is not related to intelligence; individuals with dyscalculia often have normal or above-average intelligence in other areas. Many individuals with dyscalculia possess exceptional talents in fields like art, music, English Literature and writing. The renowned author and dyscalculic Daniel Tammet is a testament to this fact.

 

Sharing Strengths at Work

Each of these diagnoses usually comes with unique strengths. For instance, autism can often be linked to remarkable attention to detail and pattern recognition. Individuals with ADHD can excel in roles requiring multitasking and out-of-the-box thinking. Dyspraxia can contribute to creativity and innovative problem-solving and those with dyscalculia often have strong verbal and linguistic skills. When neurodivergent individuals are placed in roles that align with their strengths, they often outperform their neurotypical peers in those specific areas.  

Employers should recognise the importance of allowing their employees to focus on their strengths and talents within the workplace. When employees are encouraged to excel in areas where they naturally shine, they not only feel more fulfilled but also contribute more effectively to the organisation.

However, it’s equally vital for employers to create a collaborative and supportive environment where team members can complement each other’s skills. When someone struggles with a particular task or skill, it’s a valuable opportunity to tap into the strengths of a colleague who excels in that area. This approach not only enhances overall productivity but also promotes a sense of teamwork and mutual support among employees.

Placing both neurodivergent and neurotypical people in jobs that capitalise on their strengths can greatly improve their job satisfaction. Not only this, but as an employer, you will have a team who are truly the best at what they do. Increased engagement, productivity and profit for your company could be something you see as a result.

 

Be updated

Register for our mailing list.
Gain early access to our free professional hub and community now.

Be updated

Curious about what we offer?

UNVAELD Professional Help

We do not provide professional help to individuals in urgent crisis. If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please call 999 immediately. For support with suicidal thoughts, consider contacting the Samaritans UK, a trusted organisation specialising in confidential assistance during emotional distress. Your safety is paramount and there are professionals available to provide the urgent help required in such critical situations.
We do not provide professional help to individuals in urgent crisis. If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please call 999 immediately. For support with suicidal thoughts, consider contacting the Samaritans UK, a trusted organisation specialising in confidential assistance during emotional distress. Your safety is paramount and there are professionals available to provide the urgent help required in such critical situations.